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Alzheimer's disease early symptoms? answers (454)

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Q: 

Alzheimer"s disease

A: Hi Sue - the only truly definitive test for Alzheimers is a brain biopsy, almost never done, for obvious reasons.  Since a brain biopsy is too invasive and risky,  Alzheimers gets diagnosed by ruling out common possibilities, one by one.   Confusion and memory problems can stem from a host of things including small strokes (so small the person may not show other signs of stroke), drug interactions or side effects, Parkinson"s, thyroid problems, brain tumours, pernicious anemia, depression, low oxygen levels, high fluid pressures in the brain - and a stack of other things. Alzheimer"s is one of the most common causes of confusion in the elderly, but not the only cause - so its always, always worth getting a proper diagnosis. Confusion is never a normal part of aging....


Q: 

alzheimer"s disease

A: Hello, Thank you for writing. Alzhiemer"s disease is a TYPE of Dementia.  Much like lung cancer is a TYPE of cancer.   Dementia dieases have many of the same characteristics:  physical/chemical changes of the brain that cause memory loss, personality/behavior changes, loss of physical abilities, etc. Alzheimer"s disease is a physical, deterioration of the brain brought on by amyloid plagues that settle on brain receptors and eventually kill those receptors; thus breaking down brain activity. A visual picture of this might be like ice on telephone wires that gets very heavy and eventually breaks the wires.   The messages can"t go through at that point. The challenge with Alzheimer"s

Q: 

Statin Drugs / Alzheimer"s disease

A: Hi Corra, The current evidence suggests that statin drugs actually reduce a person"s odds of developing dementia from 30-50%. There have been a number of studies with similar findings, and a couple that found no effect. At present, the jury is still out - the roots of progressive dementia can be really complex and hard to study. Here are some typical study results http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/127532.php http://brainposts.blogspot.com/2010/06/can-statin-drugs-prevent-alzheimers.html A person with acute onset dementia that is rapidly progressing may not have Alzheimer"s disease, but may have some other cause of cognitive impairment. Alzheimers tends to develop perniciously and slowly over many years. Quite often, when a person is finally...


Q: 

Alzheimer"s disease Reversel

A: Will, I apologise for not getting back to you sooner. My silly spam filter suddenly regressed and started classing all my allexperts mail as junk! There is no evidence that B12 reverses Alzheimer"s disease. B12 is used to treat pernicious anemia which can cause cognitive issues. Here is a couple of articles good article. http://autoimmunedisease.suite101.com/article.cfm/pernicious_anemia http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/12/3/389 If you have any reason to think your memory is impaired, I would urge you not to self treat, but to see your doctor and get your symptoms properly checked out. There are many things that can cause "brain fog" - and many are quite treatable if seen early (i.e. thyroid...


Q: 

Alzheimer"s disease

A: My heart goes out to you Jean-Paul. Its one thing to face this with a parent - quite another to face it in the person closest to you. I would be amazed if you were not angry, confused, grieving, and flat out terrified. As you probably know, Alzheimer"s is diagnosed by carefully ruling out other illnesses that cause confusion. The only definitive test at the moment is a brain biopsy, which is rarely done, for obvious reasons. To give you an idea of what they are looking to eliminate with all the tests - here is a partial list of things that can cause dementia (i.e mental confusion). Degenerative diseases such as Parkinson"s,  disease, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Multiple System Atrophy,...


Q: 

Alzheimer"s disease

A: Here they are, hope this helps. Mary G. Stages of Alzheimers In 1982 Dr. Barry Reisberg published what was to become the best and most widely accepted description of the stages of Alzheimer"s disease. Even today, years later, when experts referto a person being in stage 5 or stage 6, they are referring to Dr. Reisberg"s scale of seven stages. Adapted from Reisberg, B., Ferris, S.H., Leon, J.J. & Crook, T. The global deterioration scale for the assessment of primary degenerative dementia. American Journal of Psychiatry, 1982 Level 1 No cognitive decline - (or Normal Adult). No subjective complaints of memory deficit. No memory deficit evident on clinical interviews. Level 2 Very mild cognitive decline (forgetfulness or normal older adult)....


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Is Alzheimer''s disease hereditary? What are the causes and symptoms?

A: The main risk factor for Alzheimer''s disease is increased age. There are also genetic risk factors for Alzheimer''s disease. Most patients develop Alzheimer''s disease after age 70. However, 2%-5% of patients develop the disease in the fourth or fifth decade of life (40s or 50s). At least half of these early onset patients have inherited gene mutations associated with their Alzheimer''s disease. Moreover, the children of a patient with early onset Alzheimer''s disease who has one of these gene mutations has a 50% risk of developing Alzheimer''s disease. There is also...


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How is Alzheimer''s disease diagnosed?

A: Despite its prevalence, Alzheimer''s disease often goes unrecognized or is misdiagnosed in its early stages. Many health professionals, patients, and family members mistakenly view the early symptoms of Alzheimer''s disease as the inevitable consequences of aging.Despite its prevalence, Alzheimer''s disease often goes unrecognized or is misdiagnosed in its early stages. Many health professionals, patients, and family members mistakenly view the early symptoms of Alzheimer''s disease as the inevitable consequences of aging. Some disorders that can result in dementia—such as depression, poor...
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Who are Some Famous People That Had Alzheimer''s disease?

A: Famous people who suffer from the degenerative neurological Alzheimer''s disease remind us that there is currently no prevention, no cure, and no discrimination when it comes to diagnosis. Political figures, actors, and athletes alike can use their recognition to bring attention to the need for research, early diagnosis, and increased awareness. Ironically, though, the disease makes it extremely difficult for such figures to make public appearances, as they cannot reliably deliver speeches or interact with media when their memory and functionality is on the decline. Perhaps the most well-known sufferer, of course, was the 40th President of the United States, Ronald Reagan. He drastically increased public awareness...
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Are There Any Treatments for Alzheimer''s disease?

A: Although there are some treatments for Alzheimer''s disease, there is currently no cure. Treatment available focuses on delaying the onset of Alzheimer''s disease symptoms, or helping to offset dementia and hallucinations that can occur in late stage Alzheimer''s disease. Many other proposed treatments are under investigation for possible efficacy. Several medications can help delay the progression of Alzheimer''s disease. These medications include tacrine (brand name Cognex®), rivastigmine (Exelon®), and galantamine (Razadyne® or Reminyl®). Such drugs are taken during early onset of Alzheimer’s and may help reduce cognition dysfunction and dementia. Common side...


 
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