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Brain chemistry answers (1234)

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Q: 

What is brain chemistry?

A: brain chemistry or neurochemistry is the complex system which allows the brain to function with the use of chemicals known as neurotransmitters which move information around in the brain. Every person''s brain chemistry is slightly different, and a number of things can play a role in the levels of various neurotransmitters in the brain, and how those chemicals affect the brain''s function. It is believed that variations in brain chemistry may explain a variety of behavioral disorders and phenomena. The
Q: 

What Is The Relationship Between brain chemistry, Depression And Asperger''s?

A: They are all deeply intertwined. Aspergers is genetic and genetic mishaps such as Aspergers can cause people to become depressed. This is all caused by the chemistry within the brain. Anything that goes on within the mind is all chemical. When something like depression occurs it is an imbalance within the brain. The relationship between the three are very deeply inetertwined. It has been proven that Aspergers which is in the same spectrum as austism is genetic. Thus if the genetics of an individual can cause them to be suffering from the social debilitating issue like aspergers. Then it only makes sense in a less dramatic sense it can cause depression. There is a strong scientific link between

Q: 

What Is The Relationship Between brain chemistry, Depression And Asperger''s?

A: They are all deeply intertwined. Aspergers is genetic and genetic mishaps such as Aspergers can cause people to become depressed. This is all caused by the chemistry within the brain. Anything that goes on within the mind is all chemical. When something like depression occurs it is an imbalance within the brain. The relationship between the three are very deeply inetertwined. It has been proven that Aspergers which is in the same spectrum as austism is genetic. Thus if the genetics of an individual can cause them to be suffering from the social debilitating issue like aspergers. Then it only makes sense in a less dramatic sense it can cause depression. There is a strong scientific link between

Q: 

brain chemistry test

A: Hi Rex, There are many brain chemistry tests, but mood disorders are not only due to chemical imbalances in the brain, but rather due to silent diseases in the body, that may affect the brain and the mind. See: Silent Diseases and Mood Disorders at: http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/articles/silentdiseases.html _______________________________________________ Jurriaan Plesman, Nutritional Psychologist Hon. Editor of The Hypoglycemic Health Association of Australia. www.hypoglycemia.asn.au Author of "Getting off the Hook" Freely available at Google Book Search Skype: jurplesman...
Q: 

Can you changey your own brain chemistry enough to heal bipolar?

A: William,I usually don´t respond to this forum because, frankly, almost everyone here has bought into the psychiatric ''theory'' of meds for life.  Usually the questions center around, ''What time of day is best to take my meds?'' Or, "Which anti-depressant goes best with which mood stabilizer?'' But you seem to be a truth-seeker, so I´ll do my best....Ready?First, I´m not sure if you are aware of it, but there is absolutley no hard science behind the chemical imbalance theory.  In other words, there is no scientific proof at all that bipolar disorder is caused by some sort of biological defect.....ZERO. That is why psychatrists are unable to detect bipolar disorder through any sort of testing...because there is nothing biologically wrong with you.And...


Q: 

suboxone, depression and brain chemistry

A: Bev, I cant remember if you seeing a therapist or not. I do think there something like post withdrawl syndrom or something like that. Yep, your 59 and prob. feel like it. But I still think its worth not being on Narc/opts. So what if you have to stay on the Sub for 3-5 months, or what ever you doctor said. I think I remember you dont want to be tied to a clinic when your careing for your grandchild. I am sorry your depressed and think you need to get treatment for it. No since suffering with anything if there is tx for it. You still have a few months to get healthier... not going to happen over night, sweetie. Keep posting... you have already proved anything is possible. Sister I don''t know if this would help you or not but it might be worth a try. I know you really don''t want to go back...
Q: 

brain chemistry

A: @Marie Bellini, Hi, Could you tell me how I can get an answer to my question? Thank You, Marie I don''t know if there is such a thing. @Marie Bellini, are you talking about the detection of chemical doses of toxins in the brain? That is usually done by MAss Spectrometry and specialized Gas Chromatography. @Marie Bellini, You don''t say which chemicals you are interested in! A Google search using ''brain chemistry'' as your search term will yield many web sites which contain a lot of information about normal brain chemicals called neurotransmitters, and how imbalances in them can cause depression or mania or bipolar symptoms. As far as I have been able to discover there are no techniques to...


Q: 

The brain chemistry of a Manic Depressive

A: Introduction In the United States, about 2.6 percent of adults, or 5.7 million people, have bipolar disorder, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). People who are manic depressive experience both depression and mania. When depressed, bipolar disorder patients experience a low mood, feelings of hopelessness and a decreased interest in activities. When manic, bipolar disorder patients feel euphoric, have little need for sleep and participate in risky behaviors. What mood the patient has predominantly depends on the type of bipolar disorder. For example, a patient with bipolar disorder I has mainly manic symptoms with periods of depression, while a patient with bipolar disorder II has mainly depressive symptoms with periods of hypomania. But why do bipolar disorder...


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an interesting article...Dieting Can Be Depressing/Study Shows Dieting Reduces brain Chemicals Involved in Depression/By Kurt Ullman, RNWebMD Medical News/Jan. 7, 2000 (Indianapolis) -- Research published in the January issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry shows that women who have had a history of depression may be at greater risk for recurrence of depression if they diet./Low-calorie dieting can lead to depletion of a certain dietary component called tryptophan. This chemical is important for the creation of serotonin in the brain, a chemical responsible for transmitting nerve impulses, which are involved in mood regulation./"Women who have recovered from depression show an abnormal sensitivity to the mood-lowering effects of ... tryptophan depletion, ... suggesting that they may have abnormalities in the regulation of brain serotonin," writes lead author Katherine A. Smith, MRCPsych, from the department of psychiatry at Warneford Hospital in Oxford, England./The researchers identified 19 women with a history of major depression who were fully recovered and medication-free for at least six months. They also recruited 23 women with no current, lifetime, or family history of psychiatric disorders. The subjects were placed on a diet of approximately 1,000 calories per day for three weeks. During the diet, participants completed daily records of what they ate and rated themselves on three scales measuring if they were ''happy,'' ''sad,'' or ''irritable.''/The diet lowered blood tryptophan levels to the same extent in both sets of women. In those with a history of depression, there was no response by the body to compensate for the lowered serotonin levels, whereas in those without a history of depression, the body showed a hormonal adjustment to the decrease. /The authors stress that it is important to note that the dieting caused only very small changes in tryptophan. In addition, Smith stresses that the changes in the ''happy'' scores were not significant enough to warrant a diagnosis of depression./"What this suggests is that women with depression who diet are not capable of developing the same compensating responses that healthy women are," says Lawrence H. Price, MD, professor of psychiatry at Brown University School of Medicine in Providence, R.I. "I would tell my patients that it is OK to diet in a reasonable manner of slow and easy weight loss. If she becomes aware of any changes in mood, this should be brought to the attention of their therapist immediately." /Madhukar Trivedi, MD, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, tells WebMD in an interview the main significance is that any kind of insult or stressor is likely to cause brain chemistry changes in those people who have had depression. /"The take-home message from this would be that women with a history of depression should be carefully evaluated for mood before and during their dieting," says Trivedi. "If the symptoms begin to come back, they should be immediately treated. Any stress -- and dieting is a stress -- may put a person at a higher risk." /Vital Information: Women who have a history of depression may increase their risk of recurrence if they go on a controlled, low-calorie diet. /A person who is dieting may not get enough of the chemical known as tryptophan, which in turn helps create serotonin, a hormone involved in mood regulation. /Women who want to diet and have a history of depression should proceed with a slower-paced weight-loss plan and should consult their therapist if there is any change in mood./© 2000 Healtheon/WebMD. All rights reserved.

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Q: 

When you are having a fun time with your friends, what''s the brain chemistry behind that ''high'' feeling you get

A: Endorphins. But it doesn''t always work out the same for everbody. Some people dislike crowds but get “high” on extreme sports. etc. @stranger_in_a_strange_land is correct. I am not fond of crowds. I prefer small groups or one to one. @Dr_Lawrence Neither am I. Alone is my comfort zone. don''t forget catecholamines. Cocaine is doing things beyond endorphins. Endorphins and adrenaline. Serotonin and dopamine are important neurotransmitters involved in ‘feeling good'' as well. I wonder what the implications would be if they could synthesize endorphins, seratonin, and dopamine and sell it as an over-the-counter type of medication you take when you''re feeling down and out. Or maybe they have artificial substitutes out there that already mimic this. Hmmm…........


 
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