905.866 medical & health answers

Cd4 cell count answers (1698)

«Previous Page 2 from 100 Next >
Q: 

T cell count up then down

A: Response from Dr. McGowan Thank you for your question. Your partner is fortunate to have the benefit of your support and encouragement. When we measure the cd4 count, it is only the cd4 cells in the blood that we measure, not the cells in the tissues. As cd4 cells move into or out of the tissues to fight infection or inflammation there number in the blood may go up and down. The fluctuations you have observed may be due to the intercurrent episodes of pneumonia your partner has experienced. I would suspect that the cd4 count of 400 was an anomaly and so if you ignored...


Q: 

cd4 and CD8 cells count

A: Response from Dr. Young Thank you for your post. Viraday is the generic version of the very widely used and highly recommended medication Atripla (tenofovir/FTC/efavirenz). Viraday is not available for purchase here in the US or Europe. Your friend was correct in starting HIV treatment- all current national treatment guidelines recommend treatment when cd4 counts are below 350. Effective therapy (including Viraday/Atripla) will reduce viral loads to undetectable levels in at least 3-6 months and I''d expect a roughly 200 cell increase in cd4s in one year. Provided that your friend takes his medication with the utmost adherence (we aim for 95%), gets good medical follow up and is lucky not to...


Q: 

Raising your t-cell count?

A: Response from Dr. Pierone It is hard to say how long it will take for immune reconstitution to occur from a cd4 count of 10 since the rate of immune recovery is so variable. In general though, the average might be about 2 years to get above 200 cd4 cells when HAART is initially commenced in a treatment-nave person. This is contingent upon excellent adherence to therapy and the treatment of adolescent AIDS is fraught with many challenges. Hence, family support and involvement in the treatment plan is essential for the best outcome. My best wishes to your nephew....


Q: 

percentage of cd4 cells

A: Response from Dr. Pierone I think that you are right the percentage cd4 count is important and often neglected. Although it is uncommon to develop an AIDS-related opportunistic infection with cd4 count above 200, this would be more likely in someone with a low cd4 percentage. I don''t think that the natural history studies (in adults) support the statement that cd4 count percentage is a better barometer of immune function. But the percentage certainly adds important prognostic value to the laboratory assessment of HIV infection. Thanks for your comments....


Q: 

T-cell count and aids

A: Response from Dr. Young Dear Canadian Aunt- Thanks for your post; I just returned from your great country the other day. Sorry to hear about your nephew. Sounds like he''s taken the first steps to improving his health. Since he''s over the pneumonia (PCP) and started on treatment for HIV, I''d expect his health to improve in real terms. Patients with very low cd4 counts actually have excellent prognosis, provided that they are able to take their medications with adherence. The medications work very well, the key thing is just to take the medications. His viral load should reach undetectable levels within 3-6 months (or greater than 95% reduction in the first month) and his

Q: 

Lithium and T-cell count?

A: Response from Dr. Pierone I performed a literature seach on lithium and cd4 cells and was not able to find evidence that lithium lowers T cells (cd4 cells). I did find one study from 1988 that showed no impact on cd4 cells by lithium treatment in a group of 10 men with HIV infection (see link). If your source has any references I would be glad to follow up. Hope this helps....


Q: 

starting treatment at t-cell count of 170......

A: Response from Dr. Young Yes, definately I''d start therapy soon; There are plenty of persons who have had good immune reconstitution with cd4 counts at your level. Bear in mind, that the likelihood of having another complication (some are life-threatening) increases with time and decreasing cd4 count; furthermore, the likelihood of having drug-related complications seem to increase with decreased cd4. I''d support starting on therapy, but we need to make sure that your doctor has addressed adherence and side effects with you. The single most important thing that you can do to ensure the success of treatment is not to miss doses of medications. Good luck, BY...


Q: 

T-cell count

A: Response from Dr. Young Thanks for your post. I agree with your doctor. Using a bad movie metaphor, if your viral load is undetectable, the cd4s will follow. In practice, it''s not uncommon to see a rather dramatic increase in cd4s in the first months of treatment-- this gets everyone excited that you''ll see an additional hundred cell increase every 3 months. In your case, this would predict a 400 cell increase in the first year of treatment-- probably not a realistic goal (I''m typically happy with a 100-200 cell increase). The fact that all of the labs are acceptable and you''ve continued to gain weight speaks to the success of your regimen. So, congratulations...


Q: 

cd4% and count

A: Response from Dr. Pierone There is a general correlation between cd4 counts and percentages as outlined by Dr. Young. But because of inherent differences in immune makeup and function some people with HIV infection have numbers that don''t fit into this model. It may turn out that on subsequent testing your cd4 count comes up considerably, but it is also possible that you may consistently have a higher cd4% than expected. Best of luck to you and thanks for posting....


Q: 

Drop in White Blood cell count

A: Response from Dr. Young Hello and thanks for your post. Having a low white blood cell count (leukopenia) is not uncommon among persons with HIV, especially among those with lower cd4 counts. There are multiple causes, most frequently, HIV itself or medications (such as Bactrim). If HIV is the cause (there''s no way to be sure except to rule out other causes, and treat the HIV), then treatment will usually improve things. If your doctor feels it''s necessary to be on preventive treatment for PCP, it might be possible to try an alternative medication (such as Mepron or Dapsone) instead of the Bactrim. I hope this helps. Thanks for participating in the clinical trial. BY...


 
Contact us   |   Disclaimer & Privacy Policy   |