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Follicular cysts answers (116)

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Q: 

Do follicular cysts form after menopause?

A: Yes follicular cysts form after menopause. This happens because ovulation has stopped and triggers the start of menopause. Usually before menopause the follicle will release but after menopause it does not so it grows into a follicular cyst instead.. ...


Q: 

follicular cyst

A: Hello Christy, 1.  Yes, an ovarian cyst can enlarged from an fertility medication.  That is why we cannot proceed if there is a cyst.  The cyst/follicle present on your second ultrasound does not qualify as an ovarian cyst, and was not the remnant of the 3.0 cm cyst that you had previously.  It was probably a normal antral follicle which can be found in the ovaries at any time in the cycle. 2.  No.  The follicles that were present were probably not related to the previous cyst. 3.  Based on the sizes of your follicles at the time of HCG trigger, you had two ovulatory sized follicles, the 30 mm and the 24 mm.  The egg could have come from either. I hope this answers your questions and good luck, Edward J....
Q: 

Can I Become pregnent with follicular Cyst

A: The size of your cyst is not too big, but could be affecting ovulation.  Depending on your age and any other treatments that have been used, most doctors will start with Clomid for 3 months, to see if that produces ovulation.  You should be monitored with ultrasounds to see if follicles develop, and if there is any effect on the cyst....


Q: 

I understand that Tamoxifen blocks estrogen in certain parts of the body and increases it in others. My oncologist would like me to remove my one remaining ovary. However, my primary care doctor said that after finishing chemo and becoming menopausal, my HDL is only 33, which is on the lower side. I already exercise and eat a very healthy diet low in fat. My total cholesterol is fine, but I have high blood pressure. I am extremely worried about heart disease. I am much more concerned about dying from a heart attack than a cancer recurrence. I also realize that taking Tamoxifen, which I will start right after the ovary is removed, will help my HDL level to improve. My question is--If I have no ovaries and only my adrenal glands to make estrogen, do you think my level of circulating estrogen would be high enough to give me the benefit of improved cholesterol by taking Tamoxifen or should I keep my one remaining ovary so that I will have more estrogen to help my cholesterol. My cancer was stage 2A , er and pr+ with lymphovascular invasion. I am only 45 and do have a family history of heart disease. The oncologist wants to remove the ovary because I have a strong family history of colon cancer and because of my younger age at diagnosis and several, repeated ultrasounds months apart have shown what appear to be follicular cyst on the one ovary. I had a large benign mass on the other ovary a few years ago so the ovary was removed with the uterus. Sorry for the long scenario. Thank you for your time.

A: ask your oncologist about aromotase inhibitors since you will be post menopausal....
Q: 

I understand that Tamoxifen blocks estrogen in certain parts of the body and increases it in others. My oncologist would like me to remove my one remaining ovary. However, my primary care doctor said that after finishing chemo and becoming menopausal, my HDL is only 33, which is on the lower side. I already exercise and eat a very healthy diet low in fat. My total cholesterol is fine, but I have high blood pressure. I am extremely worried about heart disease. I am much more concerned about dying from a heart attack than a cancer recurrence. I also realize that taking Tamoxifen, which I will start right after the ovary is removed, will help my HDL level to improve. My question is--If I have no ovaries and only my adrenal glands to make estrogen, do you think my level of circulating estrogen would be high enough to give me the benefit of improved cholesterol by taking Tamoxifen or should I keep my one remaining ovary so that I will have more estrogen to help my cholesterol. My cancer was stage 2A , er and pr+ with lymphovascular invasion. I am only 45 and do have a family history of heart disease. The oncologist wants to remove the ovary because I have a strong family history of colon cancer and because of my younger age at diagnosis and several, repeated ultrasounds months apart have shown what appear to be follicular cyst on the one ovary. I had a large benign mass on the other ovary a few years ago so the ovary was removed with the uterus. Sorry for the long scenario. Thank you for your time

A: ask your oncologist about aromotase inhibitors since you will be post menopausal....


Q: 

endometrium is 1cm thick. having cyst in right ovary. is it normal?

A: Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in one to three months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed. A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and...
Q: 

My daughter she 7 yrs old last year she had ovarian cyst how do you get that?

A: Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve spontaneously over the course of days to months. cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Another type of ovarian cyst that is related to the menstrual cycle is a corpus luteum...
Q: 

  cyst follicular size 3.3 cm

A: Hi, follicular cyst is a simple cyst ? retension cyst of the follicle. It is likely to cause hormonalimbalance sometimes. You need to treat it immediately , as it will hamper ovulation. Any progestin taken for aperiod of 3 to 4 months will help. Consult your gynaecologist for further evaluation & scan. Take care& good luck....


Q: 

What are Ovarian cysts?

A: Ovarian cysts are fluid filled bodies that form on ovaries, and there are many types that may have few to many symptoms. Many women will get an ovarian cyst occasionally, and most are unlikely to notice the fact since the cyst will generally recess on its own with no treatment. Other cysts may grow large, become painful, and run the danger of rupturing, which can harm the ovary and is a medical emergency. The most common types of ovarian cysts are called functional cysts, and these occur when something goes wrong during ovulation. An ovary produces a follicle each month, which is similar to a cyst, and this releases an egg. Sometimes the release doesn’t occur and a
Q: 

What can I do for suspected ovarian cyst?

A: Information on cyst A cyst or sac filled with fluid, which develops in the ovary is referred to as an ovarian cyst. They resemble bubbles in an ultrasound. Developing one or more of ovarian cyst is common in women. The various kind of ovarian cysts are corpus luteum cyst, follicular cyst, endometrioid cysts, hemorrhagic cyst, polycystic appearing ovary and dermoid cyst. Most of them are harmless, though a few result in pain and bleeding. The ideal method of treatment depends on the age of the woman, size of the cyst and its appearance. Simple observation is also a way of treatment. Surgical removal of the cyst is followed by a lab test of the cyst to rule out cancer cells. Adequate rest is important. Pain...
 
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