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Hiv exposure answers (2156)

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Q: 

hiv exposure

A: Dear Sam: Thanks for caring so much for my thoughts, but the physician providing your care is the right person to ask.   The research on PEP is a little hard to assess - mostly comes from a small group of health care workers with significant exposures, some become infected, some do not, but that would happen anyway.  There seems enough statistical evidence to suggest that PEP is better than non-PEP. In theory, weakening hiv by attacking it with antiretrovial agents should reduce the chances of an infection occurring.  A real problem has been that in early PEP studies, many of the workers stopped taking the meds because of side effects.  Thus, I said "may" because I cannot speak definitively on the matter....


Q: 

possible hiv exposure

A: Hi Kevin, Please be advised that I am providing this service for educational purposes only. Any information provided below does not constitute a contract for medical services, professional medical advisory, or medical management. Please refer your questions and/or concerns to your physician for medical evaluation. Should you believe it is a medical emergency, please call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room. ----------------------------------------------------------------- You can contract hiv from either sex - male or female. Approximately 1/3 of individuals contracting hiv will develop symptoms one month after date of exposure call acute retroviral syndrome. It may also be referred to as primary

Q: 

hiv exposure

A: Hello Again, Samay, Without examining your fingernail, I cannot say what it may be. Sometimes discolorations of the nails can be due to traumatic events, fungi (onychomycosis), or other problems. Talk with your doctor about it! It is NOT RELATED TO hiv. mark  ...


Q: 

Possibly hiv exposure ?

A: According to the data you provided, you might be experiencing genital and/or urinary infection. Whether the prostate was affected can not be told without further test. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea are just some of the many possible bacterial causes for your condition. Urethral swab and urine culture with antibiogram are needed to determine the exact cause and the most useful antibiotic. Taking very potent antibiotics for longer period might affect the normal bacterial flora in the intestines and in the mouth resulting in diarrhea and/or oral fungal infection (most often candidiasis). Since you already have your treatment for the fungal infection, you might just have another hiv test three months after exposure....
Q: 

hiv exposure Assessment

A: Hi Ted, With your negative tests, you"re most likely truly negative, but I"ll answer the questions in order: 1) A review of hiv literature from 2007 said no trials have been conducted to show whether a full course of PEP delays seroconversion. PEP is so good at preventing infection, and hiv is so rare in countries routinely administering PEP, that finding enough subjects for the study would be very difficult. 3 days isn"t much, considering the recommended treatment is 30 days, but there"s no evidence either way. 2) There"s nothing you"ve said that would suggest delayed seroconversion, but it"s hard to tell. You"re probably not immunosuppressed, but you"d really have to have a blood test. Hey did you get tested to confirm you were rid...


Q: 

hiv exposure/testing?

A: Dear Kristen: Peace and all good things to you.  Four weeks is a bit early for antibody test results; six to eight weeks is a lot better, six months captures about all who will test postive.  If you are having "strange symptoms" I would hope you are in discussion with a physician who can address not only hiv but other issues that might be causing your symptoms.  There are, depending on your circumstances, a wide variety of options on hiv, STI, and other testing; the decision on what works best for you should be the subject of discussion with your doctor. Regarding being a nervous wreck:  You are either infected or not infected, and no worry will change that.  If you are infected, there are treatments available...


Q: 

hiv exposure

A: Dear Goh Hui Beng: Peace.  Thanks for asking - I don"t imagine any real hiv risk.  The amount of fluid to pose you a significant risk would have been obvious to sight or taste, the low probability that same was in the ice cream, unknown hiv status of man... all suggest it"s not even an exposure to hiv.   Please go to www.avert.org or www.unaids.org where you can find broader information on hiv and transmission in dozens of languages. Best to you and yours, Terry...


Q: 

symptoms after hiv exposure

A: Hi Mark Thanks for the follow up. Your symptoms could be due to the tabs...and the earliest time to go for an hiv test and be certain about the results is around 12 weeks/3 months. As to the symptoms for hiv, these usually appear around 2-6 weeks after being infected. Hope this helps - feel free to send a follow up. Best wishes Ian...


Q: 

hiv exposure to Air?

A: The *time* involved really isnt the issue (unless longer penetration equals more risk of rectal tearing and more area for hiv to enter the body), it has more to do with the presence of semen. Actually, I hear things like this a lot. You are definitely not alone.  ...


Q: 

hiv exposure

A: Hi Nicholas, There is no risks of exposure from him licking your fingers. As far as your eczema, try moisturizing it with Aveeno Eczema cream. Avoid lotions and body oils. As far as your second statement, "You know you can have sex with an hiv poz person and not be infected..." This is false. You can get infected by sleeping with an individual who is hiv positive if you are not careful. Anal sex increases your risks if you the receiver/bottom versus if you were top/giver. Regards, John Thai, MD...


 
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