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How do i prevent a cellulitis infection? answers (27)

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Q: 

how do I prevent A cellulitis infection?

A: First and foremost, you should protect your skin from cuts, bruises, and scraps. For example, always wear gloves and other forms of protection when working outside or in dirty areas. Next, you should wash and clean all wounds with antibacterial soap and ointments. Always change and apply clean bandages. If you have dry skin, then you should try to keep it moisturized at all times to prevent cracking and bleeding. Open wounds are targets for cellulitis infections.  If a fever develops or swelling, then you should consult a doctor as soon as possible....
Q: 

how do I Treat a Bacterial Skin infection?

A: The manner in which you can treat a bacterial skin infection may depend on the type of infection. Some minor skin infections may be treated at home with topical antibiotic creams, while others may require treatment with prescription-strength antibiotic creams and oral antibiotics. You may do well to see a doctor for a bacterial skin infection before you try to treat it on your own. Some skin infections may look fairly minor but develop into a more serious infections quickly; the right treatment may prevent them from worsening. If you discover a bacterial skin infection at home, you may apply an over-the-counter antibacterial cream as an initial measure. You may also cover it with a bandage that allows for good air...


Q: 

What's staff infection and how do you get it?

A: Staphylococci are gram-positive, aerobic organisms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most pathogenic; it typically causes skin infections and sometimes pneumonia, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. It commonly leads to abscess formation. Some strains elaborate toxins that cause gastroenteritis, scalded skin syndrome, and toxic shock syndrome. Diagnosis is by Gram stain and culture. Treatment is usually with penicillinase-resistant ?-lactams, but because antibiotic resistance is common, Vancomycin may be required. Some strains are resistant to all but the newest ribosome-targeted antibiotics (eg, Linezolid, quinupristin plus dalfopristin) or Daptomycin (a lipopeptide antibiotic).(Merck) Please see the web pages for more details and images on Staphylococcus areus,...


Q: 

Why do I get so many eye infections?

A: Infections of the eye may be caused by viruses, bacteria or other microorganisms. Eye infections can be of several types and can affect varied parts of one eye or it can develop in both eyes. The eye lids, cornea and also the optic nerves of the eye are all susceptible to infections. Different types of eye infections require different types of treatments. Infections in the eye are fairly common and some people may be prone to them, such as those who wear contact lenses. This occurs due a buildup of bacteria if the lenses are not cleaned properly. The most frequently occurring eye infections are blepharitis and pink eye.  A rarer type of eye infection is trachoma, which spreads rapidly and may even lead to blindness. Some infections of the eye are minor and maybe treated at home,...


Q: 

Is it true that once herppies is contracted it can not be cured and if so how do you limit when it resurfaces?

A: true. The virus lays dormant along a nerve trunk and resurfaces at times. Right before the onset, you get an itching type feeling where the ulcers will appear. If you IMMEDIATELY start taking Valtrex or Zovirax, you can lessen the severity. Some people who are very prone to outbreaks, take a Zovirax daily to prevent those outbreaks. It is much less expensive than Valtrex. But research seems to indicate that Valtrex may be more effective. Oral herpes and genital herpes are the same virus, just differ in location. Dear Victor, Herpes virus once contracted causes a flare and then settles into the nerves during its dormant stages. If you''re referring to cold sores, there are pharmacy medications that u can use when u...


Q: 

how do you tell the difference between pink eye or an eye infection and allergies?

A: The conjunctiva is a thin mucus membrane that covers the visible part of the eyeball and the underside of the eyelids. This membrane protects and lubricates the eye. What is it? When the conjunctiva becomes inflamed, the condition is called conjunctivitis. In children this is most often a mild infection, but the conjunctiva may become inflamed as a reaction to several different exposures, including bacteria, viruses, allergies, or irritants. Who gets it? Conjunctivitis in newborns is often caused by bacteria acquired during the process of birth. The eyes of newborns are treated with drops to prevent this type of potentially serious infection but the drops themselves can cause a mild, irritant conjunctivitis. Viral conjunctivitis is common among young children...


Q: 

I was told by my surgeon that I have cellulitis(an infection in my breast) I have had redness,swelling, and itching of my breast since I went for the simulator mapping for my radiation treatment on 10/2. Prior to that I did have the swelling I was told was from the surgery and itching and some little bumps. I thought it may have been from a laundry detergent which I stopped or from swimming. My surgeon said there was a good possibility it was from the tattoos. I had a lumpectomy on the tail end of the breast under my arem. and sentinel node biopsy ( 3 nodes removed) all negative done on 8/13. I did have what looked to be a bite on the upper inside part of my arm that went away. I have been on augmentin for the infection for a few days but as of yet don''t see any improvement. I feel a burning sensation and pain under my arm. I had to delay my radiation treatments until the infection clears up. I am concerned if I''m already having problems and I haven''t yet had radiation. I know my risks are very low for lymphadema but I am wondering what could be causing this infection and what you would suggest I do for now and to help prevent an infection during radiation. Thank you so much for your help!

A: I hear your anxiety and understand it. yes, you may be facing skin problems with radiation having already presented with a problem. The doctor might decide to do a skin punch biopsy to make sure there is nothing else of concern going on in the breast too. Let the antibiotic take time to work and then see how things look at that time. There are special lotions that radiation therapist will recommend too to prevent skin problems during radiation...
Q: 

I have a lot of blackheads on my nose. how can I get rid of them? Squeezing them doesn'' t work.

A: Please do not squeeze your blackheads! The most likely consequence is further infection and damage to the tissue around the blackhead, which can lead to more pimples. The worst result would be infection spreading into the surrounding tissue from the squeezed blackhead to cause a serious condition called cellulitis. The first step in treatment is keeping the skin clean by washing twice a day with a good soap. Then one of the numerous proprietary creams and lotions available from chemists can be used. These must be used regularly for some weeks to give them a fair trial, but if they are unsuccessful in clearing the skin, the next step is to see your general practitioner. Your general practitioner can prescribe stronger lotions and creams,...


Q: 

I have a lot of blackheads on my nose. how can I get rid of them? Squeezing them doesn` t work.

A: Please do not squeeze your blackheads! The most likely consequence is further infection and damage to the tissue around the blackhead, which can lead to more pimples. The worst result would be infection spreading into the surrounding tissue from the squeezed blackhead to cause a serious condition called cellulitis. The first step in treatment is keeping the skin clean by washing twice a day with a good soap. Then one of the numerous proprietary creams and lotions available from chemists can be used. These must be used regularly for some weeks to give them a fair trial, but if they are unsuccessful in clearing the skin, the next step is to see your general practitioner. Your general practitioner can prescribe stronger lotions and creams, as...


Q: 

I was told by my surgeon that I have cellulitis(an infection in my breast) I have had redness,swelling, and itching of my breast since I went for the simulator mapping for my radiation treatment on 10/2. Prior to that I did have the swelling I was told was from the surgery and itching and some little bumps. I thought it may have been from a laundry detergent which I stopped or from swimming. My surgeon said there was a good possibility it was from the tattoos. I had a lumpectomy on the tail end of the breast under my arem. and sentinel node biopsy ( 3 nodes removed) all negative done on 8/13. I did have what looked to be a bite on the upper inside part of my arm that went away. I have been on augmentin for the infection for a few days but as of yet don''t see any improvement. I feel a burning sensation and pain under my arm. I had to delay my radiation treatments until the infection clears up. I am concerned if I''m already having problems and I haven''t yet had radiation. I know my risks are very low for lymphadema but I am wondering what could be causing this infection and what you would suggest I do for now and to help prevent an infection during radiation. Thank you so much for your help!

A: I hear your anxiety and understand it. yes, you may be facing skin problems with radiation having already presented with a problem. The doctor might decide to do a skin punch biopsy to make sure there is nothing else of concern going on in the breast too. Let the antibiotic take time to work and then see how things look at that time. There are special lotions that radiation therapist will recommend too to prevent skin problems during radiation...


 
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