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Q: 

I wrote to you a few weeks ago and some time before that (my messages should be listed above), as I was concerned with having IBC -- which started with a ''flat pimple-like lesion'' on my left breast that has yet to go away. I had an ultrasound done after doctors and specialists detected ''a soft mobile mass''. One evaluator said the lump felt mobile but with ''irregular edges''. Nevertheless, the ultrasound detected no lesions and they ''say'' the results were normal. Still fearing IBC, I then wrote to your site and you advised me to go for a biopsy. Follwing the advice given, I had a Fine Needle Aspiration on the mass, not the skin lesion, as they thought the lesion could be superficial to the mass; a follicular/sebaceous cyst. (I mentioned to them that a couple of months ago that the skin lesion had a ''hole'' next to it with two ingrown hairs deep inside the skin). So the FNA was just done on the mass, and doctors thought it would point towards a fibroadenoma or fat lobule. The results came out as follows: '' Satisfactory but limited by scant cellularity. Negative for malignant cells. Amorphous material with rare cellular elements''. So FNA was negative but still no detection of what this solid mass is. A few days ago I went to the ER because I had pain in my breast, underarm, and chest wall, accompanied by redness, blood vessels, and warmth. No fever. Was given motrin until I went for my FNA results three days later (which was today.) The redness and pain comes and goes. Following my appointment today, I was given Vitamin E to reduce the pain and swelling. (I''ve also been PMSing during all this.) Anyway, given the ''negative'' results, we still don''t know what this is. Doctors/specialists are now saying simply ''an inflammation'' or possible ''fibrocystic disease'' but NO cysts were detected in the initial ultrasound and I''m only 28 (29 in August). Given the FNA results and after palpation of the mass, they ''say'' they don''t think it''s cancer or IBC, but didn''t prescribe antibiotics for an infection either. So what is this? And what do the FNA results mean? (especially the ''scant cellularity'' part and the ''amorphous material with rare cellular elements'' part?) And why if the results were negative, did I have redness and pain under the arm AND the chest wall, when no palpable lymphs were felt today? What could this be? Please review my previous messages above and ALL the info/symptoms I just dictated tou you, as I am still fearing IBC. Should I be worried or satisfied with the results? What could this possibly be and what should I do next?-Still Nervous ''N'' in New York City

A: wow... sorry you are still in limbo with this. FNA, fine needle biopsies, only obtain a few cells and there are situations, like this one , that there are insufficient cells in the specimen to make a conclusive decision. A breast specialist in examining you and looking into this closer would need to tell you why you have developed this redness and other symptoms. It''s feasibly impossible to decipher something like that via email-- so if still in limbo consider seeking another opinion at a breast center. you in in NYC and Sloane Kettering is certainly excellent and also a comprehensive facility. sorry i don''t have more to offer....


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How Does ultrasound Therapy Work?

A: ultrasound Therapy: Definition ultrasound; sound waves vibrating at frequencies above those that the human ear can hear, greater than 20,000cycles per second (hertz, Hz). Therapeutic ultrasound is that which is used for therapeutic (rather than diagnostic) purposes and is usually produced at 1 million cycles per second or 1 megacycle (MHz). Generally US frequency is between 0.7 and 3.3 MHz. Introduction ultrasound was first researched in Europe and was introduced to the United States in the early 1950`s, since this time, the use of ultrasound has grown, and it remains a very popular modality today. Mechanism of action US is produced by a high-frequency...


Q: 

liposuction- tumescent/ultrasound

A: Hi Terry, There"s more about lipo at my site, www.bodysculpture.com. This is such an involved question that, rather than reinvent the wheel, I decided to look at some other sources.  And, in fact, the wikipedia entry is a very good overview of the subject that addresses many of your questions.  So I"ve included it below. However, I would also say that the specific decision of which type of lipo to use is very much a personal one.  Each surgeon has developed experience and expertise in one or a combination of techniqestu, and that no technique or approach is inherently superior to any other.  The ultrasonic technique has reported advantages in areas of more fibrous tissue, such as the back and male breast, but also has a higher risk of complications, such as...
Q: 

aorta plaque ultrasound

A: Hello, The plaque can be seen on ultrasound, and a Carotid Doppler would give dimensions of this plaque that sits on the carotid bifurcation. I would advise you to go ahead with the ultrasound. It can be difficult to visualize the plaque within a calcified vessel, as ultrasound waves will not go through calcium, but since this is a non invasive modality, it is worth giving a try. The address on the signature is meant to be copy pasted in your browser window to initiate a call with me, this is a paid service powered by AT&T"s Ingineo. Regards, Dr.Joshi  ...
Q: 

I thought I was 7 weeks today, but ultrasound showed between 4 & 5. What does this mean?

A: 8 weeks & 3 days: Heard a strong heartbeat today at 166. I keep leaving updates in hopes that someone will respond with some information :) I got more bloodwork back and my progesterone had dropped more, but I''ve now started progesterone so hopefully by monday it will be up. I saw the heartbeat today!!! Thank you, Lord!!! I read all of these question that people ask and I always wonder what happened, so I thought I would leave an update.My initial HCG corresponded with the ultrasound. I don''t know what it all means, but I had the normal amount of HCG that is seen in the body when only the yolk sac can be seen on the ultrasound. however, my Progesterone level was low. Yesterday they retested my levels and...


Q: 

What Is ultrasound Liposuction?

A: Liposuction is a medical procedure used to remove subcutaneous fat, or fat lying just below the skin, from a patient in order to improve his or her appearance or, in some cases, health. ultrasound liposuction accomplishes the same task as standard liposuction, with the exception that high-frequency sound waves are first applied to the area in order to break up and partially melt the fat, making it easier to remove. ultrasound liposuction has both pros and cons, based on the frequency of complications involved with the procedure and their supposed causes. Standard liposuction involves the insertion of a tube under a patient''s skin. A suction force, referred to as negative pressure, is then applied to the tube, which sucks the fat through...


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What Is a Quantitative ultrasound?

A: Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a type of medical technology used to investigate bone density. It involves the use of sound waves at high frequencies. The manner in which the sound waves pass through bones is recorded and this gives an indication of the strength and quality of bone tissue. This type of bone ultrasound has been used in osteoporosis detection and it may be used to assess a patient`s risk before another testing procedure, known as dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), is carried out in order to make a diagnosis. Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones are weakened when the spaces inside them enlarge, making fractures more likely.. Although dual energy x-ray absorptiometry is considered the best method for diagnosing...


Q: 

What Is a Fibroid ultrasound?

A: A fibroid ultrasound is a diagnostic tool typically used for locating or treating uterine fibroid tumors, also called leiomyomas or myomas. Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous tumors that grow within the muscle tissue of the uterus. It is estimated that between 20 and 50 percent of women in their childbearing years have uterine fibroids. Some women do not experience any symptoms, but if the tumor is large or if there are multiple tumors growing inside the uterine wall, the most common signs include heavy and prolonged menstrual periods, pelvic pain or pressure, and an enlarged or bloated abdomen. initial discovery of a fibroid tumor typically is confirmed with an ultrasound in the office of a physician. The equipment...
 
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