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Malignant brain tumor answers (578)

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Q: 

What's the different between malignant and non-malignant brain tumor?

A: when my son was diagnosed with an oligo in his temporal lobe, I asked that question and was told that with tumors in the brain, it all depends on the location and how quickly they grow. A really cool website is thebrainmatters.org. malignant means it is cancerous which means the cells within the tumor rapidly divide which then causes the mass to quickly grow which causes pain and other problems. A non-malignant tumor is one that will not grow. Another name for that kind of tumor is benign. malignant means cancer and non malignant is non...


Q: 

malignant brain tumor Grade 3-4

A: Well if indeed it is a grade 3-4 PRIMARY brain tumor OR an aggressive cancer from somewhere else her prognosis is unfortunately bad in both cases. She can receive radiation therapy and chemo therapy. That can prolong survival time and decrease symptoms but her chances of a cure are unfortunately at present slim. I"m sorry I have nothing better to tell you!...
Q: 

My mother recently died of cancer at age 76. She had (hormone receptor-positive) uterine cancer at age 69 (hysterectomy and radiation therapy); aggressive, twice recurring Non-Hodgkin''s lymphoma at age 74-76 (chemotherapy and radiation ? UCLA) and in-situ invasive lobular breast cancer that went undiagnosed for 8-9 months at age 75 (mastectomy and chemotherapy - UCLA). My mother was tested and found to be negative for carrying a gene responsible for breast cancer, although I do not know the specific test/gene (UCLA). These cancers were unrelated ? not a metastasis. My brother had prostate cancer at age 49, treated at John Hopkins. I have a maternal first cousin that died at age 50 of a malignant brain tumor. My maternal aunt is now diagnosed with breast cancer (the excised tumor is the size of a ?gold ball?). She is 72 years old. She mistakenly thought the tumor was a cyst and it was left untreated for several years. I have had regular mammograms with a baseline at age 36. First and only child at age 29. I have rather large breasts, and have read that breast reduction can reduce the incidence of breast cancer. Is breast reduction surgery advisable given the above? I am 51 years old, menopausal and have not taken HRT. I had a full-body scan which showed an area of uterine ?low-density,? however my gynecologist indicated it was not significant enough to indicate a precursor to cancer. Should I have genetic testing despite my mother?s negative results? Any other advice?

A: it would be worth your while to at least sit and talk with a genetics counselor and discuss the pros and cons of you being genetically tested too. cowdens syndrome might be another gene to consider that links uterine and breast (and thyroid). to be seen here for that purpose call 410-502-7082. our BOSS program....
Q: 

What is a highly malignant brain tumor?

A: Glioblastoma...
Q: 

The Process Through Which malignant brain tumors Directly Damage Neurons Is What?

A: Compression and infiltration....
Q: 

My mother recently died of cancer at age 76. She had (hormone receptor-positive) uterine cancer at age 69 (hysterectomy and radiation therapy); aggressive, twice recurring Non-Hodgkin''s lymphoma at age 74-76 (chemotherapy and radiation ? UCLA) and in-situ invasive lobular breast cancer that went undiagnosed for 8-9 months at age 75 (mastectomy and chemotherapy - UCLA). My mother was tested and found to be negative for carrying a gene responsible for breast cancer, although I do not know the specific test/gene (UCLA). These cancers were unrelated ? not a metastasis. My brother had prostate cancer at age 49, treated at John Hopkins. I have a maternal first cousin that died at age 50 of a malignant brain tumor. My maternal aunt is now diagnosed with breast cancer (the excised tumor is the size of a ?gold ball?). She is 72 years old. She mistakenly thought the tumor was a cyst and it was left untreated for several years. I have had regular mammograms with a baseline at age 36. First and only child at age 29. I have rather large breasts, and have read that breast reduction can reduce the incidence of breast cancer. Is breast reduction surgery advisable given the above? I am 51 years old, menopausal and have not taken HRT. I had a full-body scan which showed an area of uterine ?low-density,? however my gynecologist indicated it was not significant enough to indicate a precursor to cancer. Should I have genetic testing despite my mother?s negative results? Any other advice?

A: it would be worth your while to at least sit and talk with a genetics counselor and discuss the pros and cons of you being genetically tested too. cowdens syndrome might be another gene to consider that links uterine and breast (and thyroid). to be seen here for that purpose call 410-502-7082. our BOSS program....


Q: 

What causes a brain tumor and brain cancer?

A: idk ask someone who knows gawd Abnormal or unchecked cell growth I assume, same as any other type. As for what causes that to happen I''m not so sure about. Likely the usual factors such as the person is genetically predisposed to such things, carcinogens they may have been exposed to or, possibly, illness caused by a virus. Age may also play a factor. The person''s body may have been able to keep the rogue cells in check when the body was younger but now at their more advanced age the body can''t keep up and becomes overwhelmed. smoke it could be genetics or being exposed to radition? pretty much anything these days causes any kind of cancer. Cancer can travel from one location to another. For example if you smoke and get lung cancer it can travel from your lungs to the

Q: 

What Is the Connection Between brain tumors and brain Cancer?

A: A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of cells in the brain. Some brain tumors are noncancerous, or benign, while others are cancerous, or malignant. The connection between brain tumors and brain cancer is that a certain portion of tumors found in this area will be malignant. Both types of tumors are serious, as the cranium is unable to expand to allow room for tumor growth.. In addition to being categorized as either cancerous or benign, brain

Q: 

What Are the Different Types of brain tumors?

A: There are more than 100 types of brain tumors. The main categories are gliomas, metastatic tumors, pituitary tumors, primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), and benign tumors such as meningiomas. These types of brain tumors are usually classified according to the types of cell in which they originated and the severity of the tumor.. Gliomas are the largest of the various types of brain tumors. Gliomas originate in the brainís supportive tissue, which is made up of glial cells. The most...


Q: 

brain tumor...to be or not to be operated?

A: its worth it. you love her right? shes family. just look on the brightside of this, if she lives, you can get about another 30-40 years of life with her. trust me, it will all be worth it in the end. talk to your family about it... When I was 8 I was diagnosed with a brain tumor, but it was far into my brain, and said I had a risky 50-50 chance of survival. They found out it was benign, and not worth taking the chance, because it would do more damage getting in to the brain than worth it...I am now living with the brain tumor, but it doesn''t affect me or my health, I don''t notice or pay attention to it. I get MRI''s continually, but it...


 
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