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Monoamine oxidase inhibitors answers (320)

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Q: 

What Are monoamine oxidase inhibitors?

A: monoamine oxidase inhibitors are an older class of antidepressant drugs, also known as MAOIs. They are most often used to treat atypical depression and for smoking cessation. This class of antidepressants is used less often than the other classes because of severe dietary restrictions. There can be fatal interactions with other medications, supplements, and types of food or alcohol. Depression is thought to be caused by an imbalance of brain chemicals, known as neurotransmitters, that relay signals. Examples of neurotransmitters involved in moods are serotonin and noradrenaline. If there are not enough of these compounds in the body, depression can result. These particular compounds are

Q: 

monoamine oxidase inhibitors

A: If you are having emergency surgery (or couldn"t be taken off the MAOI"s for other reasons, we can adjust our anesthetic accordingly. We would titrate opioids more carefully (using Morphine as a preferred drug). Regional anesthesia is a good choice for both intraoperative and postoperative pain relief. We would avoid succinylcholine as a muscle relaxant. Inhaled anesthetics are no problem and if you should have hypotension, we would use reduced doses of drugs to fix that because of the exaggerated response we would expect. In short (without going into a long discourse on pharmacology) we do have ways to provide safe anesthesia to patients on MAOIs. Just make sure to tell your anesthesiologist that you are on them. Ronald Levy, MD Associate Professor of Anesthesiology UTMB-Galveston...


Q: 

monoamine oxidase inhibits what?

A: MAO inhibitors are drugs (such as Marplan (isocarboxazid) Nardil (phenelzine) & Parnate) that inhibit monoamine oxidase [MAO]. Here's a web page that offers an explanation of how these drugs work to inhibit MAOs and how they differ from another class of antidepressants: http://www.healthyplace.com/communities/......


Q: 

What Is A MOA Inhibitor?

A: MAO is short for monoamine oxidase inhibitor. They are used to treat depression. They are usually reserved as a last resort because of the lethal interactions they have with certain foods and other drugs. MAO inhibitors are also used to treat people dealing with social anxiety and is also used in the treatment of Parkinson''s disease. A monoamine oxidase inhibitor blocks the monoamine oxidase enzyme, which leads to increased levels of neurotransmitters on the nervous system. Such a drug is generally reserved for resistant and atypical depression due to its side effects. monoamine

Q: 

What Are MAO inhibitors?

A: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, known as MAO inhibitors or MAOIs, are drugs used to treat depression and anxiety. These drugs can be quite dangerous and are usually employed when other lines of treatment are not effective for a patient. They are available by prescription only and patients on MAO inhibitors must observe a number of precautions. Two examples of such drugs on the market are phenelzine and selegeline. These drugs work by interfering with the action of monoamine oxidase. This enzyme is used by the body to break down monoamines. These include a large group of neurotransmitters as...


Q: 

What Is A MOA Inhibitor?

A: monoamine oxidase inhibitors are anti depression drugs. They are usually used for atypical depression, but an offlable use is for smoking cessation. MAO stands for monoamine oxidase inhibitors. MAO are a class of powerful anti depressant drugs prescribed for treatment for depression. They are particularly effective in treating atypical depression and also shown efficacy in smoking cessation. Due to potential lethal dietary and drug interactions, MAO has been reserved as last line of defense and used when other classes fails. MAO inhibitors (MAOI), are antidepressant medications. MAOIs inhibit the break down of...


Q: 

What Is a MAO Inhibitor?

A: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, also know as MAO inhibitors or MAOIs, became the first antidepressants on the market in the 1950s. The medications remain a treatment option but doctors will likely try them as a last resort due to their numerous potential side effects.FunctionMAO inhibitors block the enzyme monoamine oxidase from metabolizing the mood-altering neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine. The levels of these neurotransmitters therefore remain high, improving mood....


Q: 

What Are the Different Types of Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors?

A: Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are often prescribed as a treatment for moderate or severe clinical depression and anxiety disorders. Commonly prescribed examples include fluoxetine, under the brand name Prozac®; paroxetine, brand name Paxil®; and sertraline, brand name Zoloft®. These medications are not considered addictive but might cause withdrawal symptoms if their use is abruptly stopped. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are medications that prevent the reabsorption of serotonin, a brain chemical that influences mood. SSRIs often are prescribed as a long-term treatment to increase serotonin levels in the brains of individuals with depression and anxiety. Generally, the use of SSRIs for anxiety or depression is...


Q: 

What is an MAO inhibitor?

A: monoamine oxidase inhibitors--or MAO inhibitors--are powerful drugs prescribed for the treatment of depression. According to the Mayo Clinic, MAO inhibitors are usually an optimal choice of treatment for moderate to severe depression, or a good choice for patients who cannot take other types of antidepressants, such as tricyclic antidepressants.IndicationsThe Food and Drug Administration has approved MAO inhibitors for the treatment of depression, according to Drugs.com. The Mayo Clinic reports that doctors will sometimes use the drugs to treat other conditions, such as panic disorders or headaches....


Q: 

What is an MAO Inhibitor/?

A: 11 Jul 2011 monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs prescribed for the treatment of depression. They are particularly effective in treating atypical depression. Votes:+0CommentVote upReportSearch for questionsStill looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question. Search:Similar questionsIs this a csf inhibitor?1 answer • 4 Sep 2009 • Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Deficiency - Good afternoon, all! Newbie here... newly diagnosed, 37?Hello, all! 37 y.o. WM, diagnosed w/COPD last year, just started on Prolastin last month. Hope all is well with you folks! 1 answer • 4 Nov 2009 • Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor...


 
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