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Orbital cellulitis answers (19)

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Q: 

What is orbital cellulitis?

A: orbital cellulitis is an infection of the eye and the orbit, the underlying structure in the eye socket which supports the eye. A closely related conditions, periorbital cellulitis, involves the tissue around the eye, including the eyelid. Both conditions are considered urgent emergencies which require prompt medical attention to avoid potential complications. Left untreated, orbital cellulitis can contribute to the development of several conditions, including meningitis, which can be deadly. This condition is caused by an infection in or around the eye with a bacterium such as Staph. Trauma or recent surgery can be risk factors, as can a...
Q: 

What Causes orbital cellulitis?

A: Generally speaking, orbital cellulitis is caused by bacteria from a sinus infection. It can also be caused by Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococci (both bacterias). orbital cellulitis is most often found in children. The main cause of this coniditon is from a bacterial infection of the sinuses. Other bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae that enter the eye from a cut or other trauma may cause this condition as well orbital cellulitis can be cause by any infection in the area surrounding the eye, causing inflamation. Typically, the infection is a complication of a sinus infection or other types of...


Q: 

What Causes orbital cellulitis?

A: Generally speaking, orbital cellulitis is caused by bacteria from a sinus infection. It can also be caused by Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococci (both bacterias). orbital cellulitis is most often found in children. The main cause of this coniditon is from a bacterial infection of the sinuses. Other bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae that enter the eye from a cut or other trauma may cause this condition as well orbital cellulitis can be cause by any infection in the area surrounding the eye, causing inflamation. Typically, the infection is a complication of a sinus infection or other types of...


Q: 

In cellulitis, managed in the community, when should you refer to hospital?

A: According to the CKS guideline on cellulitis [1]   “Consider urgent hospital admission for intravenous antibiotic treatment if:  - Severe or rapidly worsening infection  - Systemic illness or vomiting  - Suspected orbital or periorbital cellulitis, deep infection, or evidence of complications  - Facial cellulitis in a child — maintain a low threshold for hospital admission and ensure that regular monitoring is in place if managed at home  - Immunocompromised  - Diabetes mellitus — admission may not be necessary if diabetes is stable, but maintain a low threshold for hospital admission and ensure that regular...
Q: 

Mucolcele in frontal sinus

A: Hi Welcome to the forum! The primary treatment of all mucoceles is open surgery. If the mucoceles are not surgically removed they get infected and can cause local, orbital (related to eye) and intracranial (related to brain) complications. After removal the general prognosis is good and continuous post operative follow up can detect a recurrence early. However on net and without examining it is difficult to give a confirmed opinion. In general excision of the whole mucocele (not obliteration) will be beneficial. However if this is not possible surgeons go for obliteration surgery. An ENT surgeon specialized in mucocele surgeries should be able to guide you better after examining your husband and by doing a CT scan or MRI of the sinus. Hope this helps. Take care!...


Q: 

Pain from sphenoidal sinuses

A: Hi, welcome to the ehealth forum and I am glad to help you. You seem concerned by the symptoms of headache, dizziness, swollen eyes, ear and jaw pains along with foggy mind and depressive mind even after sinus surgery. It is not possible to see the sphenoidal sinuses by just looking up your nose. For the examination of sphenoidal sinus: x-ray, CT scan and nasal endoscopy are the methods of choice. Complicated sphenoid sinusitis can lead to intracranial complications like cavernous sinus thrombosis and superior orbital vein thrombosis. Headache is the most common symptom of acute sphenoid sinusitis. In your case with new onset eyelid swelling, dizziness and ear pains with possible hearing loss there is strong possibility of the above mentioned complications of...


Q: 

how should I take

A: If you have the symptoms of RHUS TOX it will cure you in any potency, you need not take it in a high potency to start with, its better to start with the 30 potency three times a day half hour before meals, you can take it more frequently in the start if the pain is too severe but soon as you start feeling relief bring the dosage down to the regular one 3 times a day till 100% cure. Here are the symptoms of RHUS TOX as given in the MATERIA MEDICA by Dr William Boericke MD :- RHUS TOXICODENDRON Poison-ivy The effects on the skin, rheumatic pains, mucous membrane affections, and a typhoid type of fever, make this remedy frequently indicated. Rhus affects fibrous tissue markedly-joints, tendons, sheaths-aponeurosis, etc, producing pains and stiffness. Post-operative complications. Tearing...
Q: 

My eyes are always watering and sometimes I find stringy things inside my eyes is this normal?

A: It''s possible that you have blepharitis - a very common type of eye infection that tends to be chronic (in other words, it comes and goes). The best thing to do (and you can do this safely even if it''s not blepharitis) is eyelid scrubs twice daily and use artificial tears 3-4 times a day. Eyelid scrubs: need baby shampoo, Q-tips, and washcloth. Wet a wash cloth in warm water and hold it against your closed eyes for 5 minutes, rewetting washcloth as needed so that it is warm the whole time. Squirt a small amount of baby shampoo in the palm of your hand and add a little water. Mix the water and shampoo together with your finger (from your other hand). Then dip the Q-tip in the mix and rub it along your eyelid (the same place that you would apply eyeliner). Then using clean, cool tap...


Q: 

What Are the Common Causes of Eye Socket Pain?

A: Eye socket pain can be caused by problems with the facial nerves, infections, and underlying medical conditions. It may occur around the edges of the eyes or in the deep part of the socket behind the eye. Patients should try to determine the location so they can report their symptoms accurately to a doctor. This information can be important for ruling various diagnoses out in a patient evaluation. Treatments for eye socket pain depend on the cause but can include medications, compresses, and rest.. One potential cause of eye socket pain is a disorder like glaucoma, migraines, sinusitis, or Addison`s disease. Patients may experience intermittent facial pain with these conditions, and sometimes the pain can be located in the eye socket. Likewise, patients with temporomandibular joint...


Q: 

I HAVE A PUFFY EYES PROBLEM

A: Remedies for puffy eyes  Swelling of the eyes and the adjacent areas is indicative of any underlying condition. Stress, hormonal imbalance, fatigue, fluid retention and allergies are the primary causes. Circulation towards eyes increase after crying, thereby resulting in swollen eyes. Excessive sodium in the diet results in water retention or puffy eyes. Avoidance of processed foods proves beneficial, due to their high sodium content. Washing the face with ice cold water is helpful. Adequate amount of water, tender coconut and barley water helps in removal of toxins and other wastes. Placing cucumber slices helps in reducing oedema. Tea bags are an effective remedy. Moistened tea bags are left in the refrigerator for a while. Place the cold bags over the eyes for a few minutes....
 
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