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Protease inhibitors answers (1208)

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Q: 

What Is a protease Inhibitor?

A: A protease inhibitor is a type of medication which is designed to interfere with the activity of protease, a type of enzyme used by many viruses to reproduce themselves. protease is most notably utilized by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to replicate itself, and it is also involved in the replication of hepatitis C. By developing drugs which target protease, pharmaceutical companies can market products which will reduce the overall viral load in patients, even if they cannot cure viral infections, and a reduced viral load will help a patient stay healthier longer. The first protease inhibitor was approved for sale in 1995, and several other products quickly...


Q: 

Can protease inhibitors and angiostatin help treat cancer?

A: protease inhibitors are used to treat HIV infection. Angiostatin is an anti-angiogenesis drug. Angiogenesis means the growth of new blood vessels. Growing cancers can attract new blood vessels to grow towards them because they need their own blood supply in order to grow. You can read more about how a cancer gets its blood supply in the section of CancerHelp UK on how cancers grow. Researchers are looking into using anti-angiogenesis treatment for cancer. By using drugs that can block the cancer''s blood supply, so that it will not get enough food and oxygen to continue to grow. The growth of the cancer can hopefully be slowed down or stopped, at least for a period of time. This treatment would not be able to get rid of the cancer...
Q: 

What disease are protease inhibitors used to treat?

A: ... protease inhibitor , any of a class of drugs that interfere with replication of the AIDS virus ( HIV ), by blocking an enzyme (protease) necessary in the late stages of its reproduction....


Q: 

What is a protease inhibitor?

A: ... protease inhibitor , any of a class of drugs that interfere with replication of the AIDS virus ( HIV ), by blocking an enzyme (protease) necessary in the late stages of its reproduction....


Q: 

protease inhibitors should they be avoided?

A: Response from Dr. Young Fred-thanks for your question. I''ve not had a chance to read the POZ article, but yes, many drug, including protease inhibitors are associated with a number of side effects, and that resistance is a major limitation of treatment. However, I think that this is a worse case scenario that might overly scare people away from therapies that are well tolerated and even life saving. Indeed, in my practice, we have several hundred patients who are tolerating protease inhibitor therapy very well, indeed, a recent survey of many of these persons offered them the opportunity to switch to other treatments (non-nuke-based) and nearly all refused to switch. I''d view this observation as a statement for...


Q: 

protease inhibitors vs. Triple Nucleosides

A: Response from Dr. Cohen A few comments to see what I can do to clarify what you''ve read. First - the guidelines. They do comment on some of the protease inhibitors that they recommend as part of a first combination, such as Viracept. They also comment on other non-protease inhibitor combinations. For example they also strongly recommend Sustiva. So there is no controversy about one part of your question - while the protease inhibitors can be a part of initial therapy - there is no debate that we can do an excellent job of controlling HIV with or without one in the regimen. So - how about three nucleosides - or Trizivir? This combination has some supporters and does...


Q: 

Going off protease inhibitors

A: Response from Dr. Young Thanks for your question. It certainly sounds like you have evidence of viral resistance to your current treatments. An important decision at this point is whether to continue on therapy (with a treatment switch) or to discontinue therapy. I probably wouldn''t recommend staying on your failing regimen; this would only place you at increasing risk for high levels of drug resistance and increased risk for cross resistance among the drugs of the same class. Stopping therapy would have the advantage of reducing the risk of resistance and eliminates the side effects of the drugs. Stopping therapy might cause you CD4 cells to decrease placing you at risk for other complications; this risk and short-term benefit have to be weighed and balanced for your individual...


Q: 

vitamins and anti-viral protease inhibitor?

A: Response from Dr. Cohen protease in your vitamin supplement would have no important interaction with your protease inhibitors - but it''s great you are checking the label and looking at these details. protease inhibitors interfere with a viral protease enzyme - this is an essential chemical that HIV makes for itself. It does not likely have anything to do with the protease that is in your supplements - which is more likely an enzyme trying to help you digest proteins better. It is not clear if taking protease would help you in any way in terms of your liver - so you might choose a brand that...


Q: 

protease inhibitor boosting

A: Response from Dr. Cohen Hmmm... well, I am not sure exactly what you are asking about but let me take a guess. You are taking a protease inhibitor - Crixivan. What this means is that this drug interferes with a key step in the virus life cycle - a step that involves the use of an enzyme that the virus makes called a protease enzyme. And Crixivan, like the other protease inhibitors, inhibits the ability of the virus to make more virus. The meds do this by just getting in the middle to the active place on the enzyme - like putting a wrench in the cogs of the machine. And when the enzyme stops, so does the virus factory stop. Now - what is a booster? Well, anything that increases the potency...


Q: 

protease inhibitors and children

A: Response from Dr. Cohen The protease inhibitors are not yet approved for children, but they arewidely used. Ritonavir is available in a liquid formulation that I''m toldtastes pretty nasty. Nelfinavir will be available in a powder form that I''mtold will taste ok and can be mixed with just about anything. There are nopreparations of indinavir or saquinavir that can be easily taken by kids. Even if I were a pediatrician, I''d probably be unable to answer your lastquestion without knowing more about the CD4 cell count and viral load....


 
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