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Proton pump inhibitors answers (918)

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Q: 

Should I stop taking my omeprazole and my husband stop taking his Prevacid to avoid the potential side effect of bone fractures?

A: Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that the class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which omeprazole (Prilosec) and Prevacid (lansoprazole) belong to, may increase the risk of hip, wrist, and spine fractures with high-dose or long-term use. The FDA also warns that the risk of hip fractures and other osteoporosis-related fractures must be balanced against the benefits of proton pump inhibitors, which can provide relief for symptoms of acid reflux, GERD, and ulcers. Some people find PPIs to be the only GERD treatment that works for them. If you are currently taking PPIs and are concerned about possible...


Q: 

Anxiety and Stress - Suffering from GERD as a result of taking those psychodrugs?

A: proton pump inhibitors should help with GERD. Talk to your doctor. If he/she agrees to prescribe it then you can see how well it works for you... I''m sure it''ll help. Thanks Marvell. Isn''t it true that you shouldn''t be taking that medicine for a long period of time? I read somewhere that it should be taken 7-10 days which is impossible if you''re on higher dosages of those psychodrugs. The cause is the effect/ is the effect the cause? Hmm! MarvellYou can take proton pump inhibitors long term if needed. There is no problem with that. Add your Comment You can take proton pump

Q: 

Details of GERD and its treatment

A: The data you provided (ulcerated esophagus, condition not much improved after a course of proton pump blockers) might indicate that the condition is caused by GERD (GastroEsophageal Reflux Disease), rather than hyper production of gastric acid. GERD is a condition in which the gastric acid enters the lower part of the esophagus from the stomach. There are a number of causes for this, but most frequently the muscle at the beginning of the stomach does not function (close) properly allowing the acid (and food, if present) to leave the stomach. A diaphragmal hernia is a condition in which part of the stomach might protrude through a hole in the diaphragm that is unusually big. This might put pressure on the stomach enough to squeeze the acid...


Q: 

Is is true I should not be on a PPI, like Aciphex, if I have Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

A: Hemochromatosis occurs when the body absorbs too much iron from foods (and other sources such as vitamins containing iron). This disease causes extra iron to gradually build up in the body’s tissues and organs, a term called iron overload. If this iron buildup is untreated, it can, over many years, damage the body’s organs. Aciphex (rabeprazole) is a proton pump Inhibitor (PPIs). This medication works by disabling the acid producing pumps in the stomach that contribute to the increased amount of acid in conditions like acid reflux. It has been found that stomach acid is an essential step in the absorption of iron, and when taking medications that decrease the acid production you therefore interfere with iron...


Q: 

Is there an alternative treatment for acid reflux that does not include medication?

A: There are a few concerns with long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), including Prevacid (lansoprazole). The one that has gotten a lot of attention lately is an increased risk of fractures in patients taking PPIs long-term. Others involve possible electrolyte and vitamin imbalances, weight gain, and a chronic inflammation of the stomach. In May 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a safety announcement about an increased risk of hip, wrist, and spine fractures associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The FDA is requiring labeling changes to include warning information on this issue. The FDA''s...


Q: 

PVC as a side effect of PPI

A: Dear Saeb, Thanks for letting me know that proton pump inhibitors can make premature beats more common. They are still benign even when frequent for people with normal hearts on echo.  You need not worry. Please write back if this note doesn"t answer all your questions. David Richardson....
Q: 

c. diff. treatment and recovery

A: Although Vanomycin may seem better in medical literature it may not be the best option for you. I would try the metronidazole, and if it doesn"t clear up your c.diff then you know that there is another option for you. In terms of the nexium, there has been evidence that proton pump inhibitors can be causing some cases of c.diff, but unless your doctor told you to discontinue the nexium I would stay on it. Although it may cause one health concern it is helping your acid-reflux, which is very important to keep under control. Although you have read many stories about c.diff and the negatives of some of the treatments you have to remember that most of the things written by people using the medicaitons always seem to be...
Q: 

What is the danger of long-term use of omeprazole for acid reflux?

A: Long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), the class of drugs including omeprazole, may interfere with the absorption of calcium and possibly, vitamin B12. The risk of hip fractures may be increased with long-term use of PPIs. Also, a form of gastritis (an inflammation of the stomach tissue) may be increased in certain people with long-term use of PPIs. Your healthcare provider is best able to evaluate the risk of long-term PPI use based on your specific circumstances. You may want to discuss the possible need for nutritional supplements with your healthcare provider. Always read and follow the complete directions and warnings on over-the-counter products and discuss their use with your healthcare provider...


Q: 

I take Pariet, which is very expensive. Would Prevacid work as well?

A: Pariet (rabeprazole), known as Aciphex in the United States, is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). There are a variety of medications available in the PPI class, including Prevacid (lansoprazole). They all have similar actions and uses. Consult your health care provider for any questions about changing medications, as they are best able to help guide your treatment choices. Do not stop or change the amount of medication you take without talking to your health care provider first. You may also find helpful information at: http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/aciphex....


Q: 

For treatment of heartburn, can my husband alternate between Prilosec and Prevacid?

A: Both Prilosec (omeprazole) and Prevacid (lansoprazole) are members of a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). They decrease the amount of acid produced in the stomach. Both are used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions caused by excess stomach acid. They can also be used to promote healing of erosive esophagitis (damage to your esophagus caused by stomach acid) and stomach ulcers. As with most drug classes, some patients may respond better to one medication than another. The dose of Prevacid generally ranges from 15...


 
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