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What is acute coronary syndrome? answers (62)

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Q: 

what is acute coronary syndrome?

A: acute coronary syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which emerge when the supply of blood to the heart is restricted. When a patient presents with acute coronary syndrome, immediate intervention is required to determine what is causing the condition and address it before permanent damage occurs. A doctor can diagnose acute coronary syndrome with the assistance of an electrocardiogram (ECG) as well as bloodwork and a patient interview. The key symptom is chest pain,...
Q: 

what is the difference between acute coronary syndrome and unstable angina.

A: acute coronary syndromes is an umbrella of heart-related problems that range from unstable angina to a full blown heart attack. In other words, unstable angina may represent a less severe type of ACS that if treated early may not result in a heart attack....


Q: 

what is the difference between acute coronary syndrome and unstable angina.

A: acute coronary syndromes is an umbrella of heart-related problems that range from unstable angina to a full blown heart attack. In other words, unstable angina may represent a less severe type of ACS that if treated early may not result in a heart attack....


Q: 

what is The Role Of Troponin T In The Diagnosis And Risk Stratification Of acute coronary Syndromes?

A: A significant proportion of patients presenting to accident and emergency departments complain of chest pain. Early risk stratification is vital with the primary aim being to identify life threatening conditions such as acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and ensure their appropriate management, especially since the majority of patients have either non-cardiac chest pain or stable angina and are at low risk. Risk stratification: The initial step in risk stratification is an ECG. Patients with acute ST elevation are considered to have an acute MI and...
Q: 

what is Prasugrel?

A: Prasugrel is a platelet inhibitor in tablet form that is usually prescribed to patients along with aspirin. Its users are typically those who have had heart attacks or stroke and underwent angioplasties. The main condition the drug helps to treat is acute coronary syndrome in patients undergoing planned percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Other conditions for which prasugrel may be prescribed are severe chest pain and blood clotting. This particular medicine is in the class of anti-platelets drugs and acts by preventing platelets from clotting together, a problem that could lead to heart...


Q: 

what is Angina? its somthing related to heart disease...shrinkage of a vessel.?

A: Angina is the pain you get when your heart doesnt get enough oxygen. It is caused by ischemic Heart Disease, namely a condition caused by narrowing of the blood vessels supplying the heart muscle. This is usually caused by plaque from cholesterol. It feels the similar to when you have a heart attack - usually a burning or pressing sensation on your chest sometimes radiating down your left arm and up your neck and jaw. It varies from person to person and often presents as abdominal pain in women. The difference between angina and a heart attack is that a heart attack causes permanent damage to your heart where as...


Q: 

what is the difference between Angina Pectoris and Myocardial Infarction?

A: Angina pectoris is a crusiating egoning pain experienced on the left side chest wall called precordium may have extension to left arm and left side neck and jaw also or back side of chest with lots of perspiration!It is a symptom arising from low blood supply to heart muscle!!Where as Myocardial Infarction means some part or area of the heart muscle it self is on its death way !or is died and have become non elastic fibre permanently !!this INFARCT patch will remain for ever on the heart surface where as Angina will go away using coronary dilator drugs.Angina may become a cause of Infarction...


Q: 

what is Clopidogrel?

A: Clopidogrel, or clopidogrel bisulfate, is an antiplatelet drug that prevents blood clots caused by platelets sticking to each other. This drug is most commonly prescribed to people who experienced a recent heart attack or stroke and need to reduce their risks for another. It also can be used to treat patients with conditions that increase the chances of heart attack or stroke, such as peripheral artery disease (PAD) acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Antiplatelet drugs work by preventing the formation of blood clots. Blood clots naturally form to stop bleeding from a wound but can be dangerous...


Q: 

what is Apixaban?

A: Apixaban is an anticoagulant used to prevent blood clots. This medication is given to patients who have recently undergone surgery of the knees or hips and to those with atrial fibrillation. It is not available to the public yet, though initial studies show that it is an effective treatment. Though apixaban is in the anticoagulant class, its mechanism of action is unlike other anticoagulants. There are a number of enzymes that play a part in the process of forming blood clots. Apixaban interferes with factor Xa, while other anticoagulants prevent blood clots by interfering with other enzymes. ...


Q: 

what is a Stent Thrombosis?

A: Stent thrombosis is a dangerous condition that occurs when a blood clot forms on a stent. It has symptoms much like cardiac thrombosis of any kind and it is classed by the time in which it occurs after the placement of the stent: very early or first month, early or first year, and late or after a year. A person who has a stent should be aware of sudden feelings of tiredness, inability to draw breath, easy exhaustion, or angina. Additional symptoms might include full myocardial infarction, or heart attack. People could have strong pain in the chest or stomach, difficulty breathing, nausea, pain that shoots down the arm, or any loss of consciousness. This second set of...


 
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