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What is nonbacterial prostatitis? answers (23)

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Q: 

what is nonbacterial Prostatitis?

A: nonbacterial prostatitis is a medical disorder that causes inflammation of the prostate gland. The condition is most common in men between the ages of 15 and 40, though doctors are unsure of its exact causes. A man with nonbacterial prostatitis may experience pain when urinating or ejaculating, frequent urges to urinate, and chronic soreness in the groin area. Left untreated, symptoms tend to persist or worsen over time. Depending on the severity of a person''s condition, treatment usually involves home remedies or prescription medications to relieve discomfort. Many...
Q: 

nonbacterial prostatitis

A: You need to have a workup.  A urine culture is needed to make sure you are on the correct antibiotic.  Also a ultrasound of the prostate to make sure there is no abscess in the prostate.  A Cystoscopy to see if there is any scarring in the urethra. A urodynamics study will show exactly what is going on in the bladder when you have the feelings you stated....
Q: 

Chronic nonbacterial Prostatitis

A: I do not agree with the use of steroids.  Too many potential problems and complications to be worth the benefit.  Otherwise, I pretty much agree with the third urologist.  I see no need for a biopsy at your age without more signs or symptoms of a possible problem. Other treatments for prostatitis include sitting in a very hot tub of water for 5-10 minutes (often helps, no complications and costs very little).  The water needs to be quite hot.  For severe cases, I recommend twice or three times a day.  Next, use of a flow enhancer like Flomax or Uroxatral.  Avoid caffeine and alcohol.  Don"t smoke (it constricts the blood vessels and causes prostatic congestion).   ...
Q: 

Overactive bladder or Prostatitis?

A: Michael, you do indeed have an "overactive bladder" but I believe it is due to prostatitis and not the overactive bladder syndrome.  The latter does cause frequency of urination but rarely any of the other symptoms you describe.  I don"t know if you have previously read my "macro" on prostatitis so I will attach it to this note.  It contains most of the information you need to understand the condition and the various types of prostatitis.  It is as follows: The most common cause of these complaints is an inflammation of the prostate gland, so called prostatitis....
Q: 

Prostrate/Prostatitis

A: Dennis, your symptoms sound typical of prostatitis.  You apparently responded to the Cipro but although the antibiotics calmed you prostate down, it did not eliminate the infection.  This is why I generally recommend at least a 4 week course of antibiotics initially.  In men with recurrences, I retreat for 6 weeks.  In some patients, the infections recur frequently.  In these individuals,once I get them asymptomatic, I keep them on a low daily dose of antibiotics with good results.   I have written a "macro" on prostatitis that I believe answers all of your questions about alcohol, diet, sexual frequency,...
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A possible bacterial prostatitis from an STD infection?

A: Matt, you are correct in that the most common cause of your complaints is an inflammation of the prostate gland, so called prostatitis.  Symptoms that might occur with prostatitis include frequency of urination, slowing of the urinary stream, burning with voiding or ejaculation, burning in the penile tip unrelated to voiding, urethral discharge, sexual dysfunction (such as difficulty with erection), aching in the penis, testicles, and discomfort in the lower abdomen, low back, groin, rectum or perineum (the area between the scrotum and rectum ? between the ?wind and the rain?) and constipation. The passage of blood at the initiation or...
Q: 

Prostate pain leading to spermatic pain

A: Dave, by far the most common cause of genital and scrotal pain in the presence of anatomically normal testicles (& apparently your urologist has determined this) is indeed an inflammation of the prostate gland, so called prostatitis.  However, there are many varieties of prostatitis.  Symptoms that might occur with prostatitis include frequency of urination, slowing of the urinary stream, burning with voiding or ejaculation, burning in the penile tip unrelated to voiding, urethral discharge, sexual dysfunction (such as difficulty with erection), aching in the penis, testicles, and...
Q: 

what could urinating blood mean?

A: The medical term for bloodAmylase - blood Bleeding Blood cells Blood clot formation Blood clots Blood culture Blood differential Blood gases Blood gases test Blood glucose monitoring Blood in semen in the urineCalcium - urine Calcium urine test Chloride - urine Cortisol - urine Electrolytes - urine Glucose test - urine Hcg in urine Ketones - urine Kidney - blood and urine flow Lh urine test (home test) Ph urine test is hematuriaRbc - urine Urine - bloody . If you are a woman, urinaryBladder outlet obstruction Bladder stones Calcium - urine Chloride - urine Cortisol - urine Cystitis - acute bacterial Female urinary Tract Frequent or urgent urination Inflatable artificial sphincter Kidney...


Q: 

utc or what?

A: Matin, I can state with certainty that at the present time there is no evidence that your kidneys are abnormal.  The findings and dimensions of your kidneys on ultrasound are normal.  The serum creatine & BUN which measure the ability of your kidneys to excrete waste products is normal (normal less than 1.8-2.0 and less than 25 respectively).  Furthermore, using your height, weight, and 24 hour urinary excretion of urine volume and creatinine, I was able to calculate a very important measure of kidney health:  the "creatinine clearance".  The normal range for a male is 100-135 ml/min.  Your value is 130 ml/min.  In summary, both from an anatomical...
Q: 

chronic nonbacterial prstatitis with erectile dysfunction

A: Hello Aseel,   Chronic nonbacterial Prostatitis is a condition where there is pain in the prostate but no sign of infection or bacteria for the cause. It can affect sexual function as well as urination among other things. You can read about CNBP here. As far as prognosis, it depends on what method of treatment you and your doctor have decided to pursue.   While online sites are great resources for information that will help you ask all the right questions when it''s time to see your doctor, but they can not take the place of your doctor''s sound medical advice. In this case, it

What Is Nonbacterial Prostatitis? related drugs: Yohimex  · Yohimbe  · Erex  ·
 
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